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New Zealand track cyclists continue their golden start to the Commonwealth Games

Aaron Gate, center, and Tom Sexton, left, shared the podium after finishing first and second in the men's individual pursuit.

Ian Walton/AP

Aaron Gate, center, and Tom Sexton, left, shared the podium after finishing first and second in the men’s individual pursuit.

The New Zealand track cycling team continued their golden start to the Birmingham Commonwealth Games by winning four more medals, including three gold, on another stunning day at the Lee Valley VeloPark in London.

The New Zealand national anthem was played three times in the space of just a few hours as in-form runners Aaron Gate, Bryony Botha and Ellesse Andrews took to the podium after stunning individual triumphs.

New Zealand have been the best performing nation on the track so far, winning eight medals, including five gold, in the first two days of competition.

And there could be more to come with Andrews still to compete in the keirin, the event in which she announced herself with a silver medal at the Tokyo Olympics last year.

New Zealand won six gold medals in cycling at Glasgow 2014.

Gate won his second gold medal in as many days after overhauling teammate Tom Sexton to win an all-New Zealand men’s individual pursuit final by 4.419 seconds.

24 hours after helping to win New Zealand’s first men’s team pursuit gold medal since 1990, Gate and Sexton found themselves in the unusual position of going head-to-head after posting the fastest two times in qualifying, Gate setting a new Commonwealth Games record of 4: 07.129.

Sexton came out strong in the final and led by 1.4 seconds at the halfway point, but he was unable to maintain a consistent pace and faded during the second half of the 4000m race. , Gate heading home to win in 4:07.760 after posting seven laps in under 15 seconds.

Ellesse Andrews is congratulated by her family after winning the individual sprint final.

Ian Walton/AP

Ellesse Andrews is congratulated by her family after winning the individual sprint final.

Botha outperformed the silver medal she won in the team pursuit, dominating the women’s individual pursuit final with an ultra-regular run.

Botha broke her own Commonwealth Games record she set in qualifying, leading from start to finish to comfortably beat Australian Maeve Plouffe by a staggering 8.666 seconds.

After the first lap, only 0.265 seconds separated his slowest and fastest laps.

The 24-year-old caught Plouffe at the finish of the 3000m race as she dropped below 3:19 for the first time in her career to post another world-class time of 3:18.456.

Botha is the fourth New Zealand rider to win gold in the women’s individual pursuit after Alison Shanks in 2010, Sarah Ulmer in 2002 and 1998 and Madonna Harris in 1990.

“I honestly can’t believe it,” she told Sky Sport. “I wasn’t too sure how my legs would feel. In the warm up I was like it would be what it would be and when I got there I felt really good and I went on and carried it.

Bryony Botha celebrates on the podium after winning the individual pursuit.

Ian Walton/AP

Bryony Botha celebrates on the podium after winning the individual pursuit.

“I didn’t expect to catch up with her. Maeve is a strong rider and I thought we would be pretty balanced. When I looked up and saw her there, I was like I was just going to use the draft and make the most of it.

Andrews stunned defending Olympics champion Kelsey Mitchell of Canada to win the women’s sprint, giving the 22-year-old her third medal and second gold after leading New Zealand to sprint glory per team.

Andrews showed incredible power to get the better of Mitchell and beat the gold medal favorite down the line in the first two final races.